Drew Barrymore’s Perimenopausal Episode Caught Live on Air

In a recent interview alongside Jennifer Aniston and Adam Sandler, Drew Barrymore openly mentioned experiencing what she believed was her first hot flash, visibly cooling herself down afterwards.

During a March 27 episode of her talk show, Drew Barrymore had a memorable moment alongside guests Jennifer Aniston and Adam Sandler.

While on air, Barrymore felt the onset of what she thought was her very first perimenopause hot flash, prompting her to declare, “I am so hot, I think I’m having my first perimenopause hot flashes,” In response to the incident, she removed her blazer.

Jennifer Aniston light-heartedly chimed in, “Oh, I feel so honored (to witness this),” while helping Barrymore adjust her outfit.

Barrymore maintained her poise throughout, turning to her guests and asking, “I’m so sorry, do you feel this? Or perhaps it’s just my excitement.” Gratefully, she said, “Well, I’m so glad I have this moment documented.”

The topic of perimenopause wasn’t new for the actress. She’d previously spoken with Gayle King on CBS Mornings’ Facing Fertility series about recognizing signs of perimenopause when her menstrual cycle changed. Voicing her worries about enduring the symptoms for potentially a decade, Gayle King, aged 68, reassured her that while the stage might not last ten years, some effects might linger.

King offered a candid take on her own experience, detailing how extreme symptoms can sometimes draw concerned reactions from others, referencing an instance on the red carpet.

Highlighting the importance of transparent discussions on menopause, Barrymore voiced her hope to shift perceptions. She insisted that menopause shouldn’t be seen as a sign of aging or declining vitality. Barrymore championed the idea that continued conversation can dispel associated myths, adding that many women in their middle ages remain active and live passionately, debunking age-old misconceptions about menopause.

Such on-air admissions are rare, but Barrymore’s situation is one many can relate to. She stands among the 15 million working U.S. women between the ages of 45 to 60 who may encounter menopausal symptoms.

Despite its prevalence, many women remain silent about their menopause journey. This silence can have broader implications, affecting both their personal well-being and posing challenges in the workplace, impacting the U.S. economy. The Mayo Clinic reports that the economic cost, considering lost work hours and other factors, is around $1.8 billion every year.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *